The calorific value is essential in assessing the value of firewood.

Firewood

The most pleasant warmth is the warmth generated by wood. Firewood or kindling are broad colloquial terms for wood fuel, which is the generic term for the various forms of traded wood, such as ready-to-use logs, split logs and brushwood. The extent to which the wood maintains its structure is what differentiates the types. The calorific value is essential in assessing the value of firewood. Other relevant characteristics might include the burn time, the appearance and the smell generated while the wood burns. Among other clients, we also supply DIY stores and wholesalers. We are also happy to supply our products to retailers and work out a personalised price plan for you. We can deliver our firewood either as bagged cargo or on pallets. Alongside single types of wood we also offer mixed wood bundles and kindling, as well as briquettes. Our firewood is particularly renowned for its dependable quality.

Your wood will arrive stacked and ready-to-use, kiln-dried and in various lengths (i.e. different packaging variants). Depending on your storage requirements you can order the wood stacked on pallets, loosely piled or in net bags. Within Melle and a 100km radius of the city, we can deliver the wood directly to the intended storage location, provided that there is unrestricted access.

» Wood types & prices

We are happy to advise you on choosing between our well-stocked supplies of beech, alder, oak and birch wood. Here you will find summaries that we have prepared listing the benefits and disadvantages of each type of wood. Please feel free to ask us for details of other types of wood and waste cuttings from production that are suitable for use as kindling.

Firewood

Beech/hornbeam

Beech is a heavy and hard wood with a subtle reddish glow. It is beech sapwood that is usually used as firewood. It is identified by its smooth bark and smooth flames while burning, and quickly generates an intense heat.

Firewood

Alder

Alder burns very well. Owing to its short burn time, it is particularly suitable for the transition period.

Firewood

Birch

Birch burns well with beautiful blueish flames and a pleasant aroma. Owing to its short burn time, birch is likewise suitable for the transition period.

Firewood

Oak

Oak is a very hard and heavy wood with a lustrous yellow-gold appearance. Its pronounced wood rings are indicative of a high energy density. This wood burns quietly and for a long time, and produces very little residual ash.

 

Firewood

Ash

Ash is not only an excellent hardwood for wood and parquet flooring but serves also extremely well as firewood for open fires in the cold season. 

  • Smooth and calm combustion with a beautiful flame aspect
  • Hardwoods like ash contain few resins and therefore produce almost no flying sparks or embers
  • Heating value of approx. 2.000 kWh/rm
  • Ash wood keeps embers and heat for a long time

Firewood

Kindling

Do you need kindling?
We offer the right kind of softwood for this purpose, dry and immediately usable, packed in a practical 3-kg net bag and at a fair price. Whether for the fireplace in the home or the warming fire pit in the garden, you will have a cosy fire going in no time at all with our kindling.

Firewood

Briquettes

Briquettes are a popular alternative to conventional firewood because of their many useful properties. Our briquettes are a mixture of spruce, pine, birch, hornbeam and alder woods. As well as having a high calorific value (4.9 kwh/kg), their CO2 neutrality means they are climate-friendly. Briquettes from Holz Schäfer are manufactured without the use of any additional binding agents, and the ash can be perfectly recycled for use as garden fertiliser or in the compost pile. If you want to enjoy the warmth from the fire quickly, this type of firewood is perfect for you, and you can enjoy a steady flame pattern.

Delivery

We can deliver your wood to your home.

A little tip from us: If your neighbour is also in need of firewood,
why not plan a joint delivery on the same day?